Funerals of 6 Shia professionals killed in Karachi and Quetta (26 Jan 2012)

by admin

Karachi

The fanaticism of sectarian groups killing members of the Shia community has been a bane in Pakistan flourishing in its magnitude with each passing day and will continue to do so owing to the lax response of the law enforcers. On Wednesday, six men belonging to the Shia Muslim community became their targets in Karachi and Quetta, gunned down in a similar way. Three of the deceased in Karachi were lawyers and members of the Legal Aid Committee while the other three murdered in Quetta belonged to the peaceful Shia Hazara community. They included an inspector of the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA), a television artist and a poet. The killings took place only a day after two activists of the Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ) — a re-organised version of the banned militant group Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) — were shot dead in Karachi. There is speculation that the Karachi killings were in response to the murders of ASWJ activists. However, this should not be treated as a ‘tit-for-tat’ response in the face of the mounting death toll of Shias being killed every other day around the country.

Thousands of Shia Muslims have been killed during the last three decades across the country after General Zia in collaboration with Saudi Arabia endorsed the Deobandi militants and sowed the ugly seeds of sectarianism in society. Since then, the country has been witnessing sectarian violence and bloodshed. Sectarian groups have gained so much strength that it seems almost impossible to control their terrorist activities. Unfortunately, there are several lacunae in the country’s legal system and the prosecution regime is full of flaws, which in turn facilitates the terrorists even if some of them are captured. The same happened in the case of Malik Ishaq, the chief of defunct sectarian group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) who has been released by a court despite the fact that his group had claimed responsibility for the Mastung deadly attack on Iran-bound innocent Hazara pilgrims last year. It is even more unfortunate that Ishaq enjoys a soft corner in the heart of the Punjab government. The presence of these extremist elements can be easily felt in the state institutions, which is another reason for the government’s helplessness against them. The situation indeed reflects the paralysis of political will to take a stern action against these gory murderers.

The time has come that the government decide the fate of these religious fanatics and use all force to crush them otherwise this contagion will spread and invite retaliation from the victim community. There is also an urgent need to improve the faulty Anti-Terrorism Act and criminal laws or replace them with specially made effective laws so that justice can be served. To fight these saboteurs of peace and religious harmony, the government has to act decisively. (Source)

Quetta

Kab Tak on Dawn News 26th January 2012 (Sofia Jamal)

3 lawyers’ funeral in Karachi:

Aaj Kamran Khan Ke Saath (Geo News) – 26th january 2012

Shia Killing: Funeral of 3 Shia lawyers (Karachi, 26 Jan 2012)

3 Comments to “Funerals of 6 Shia professionals killed in Karachi and Quetta (26 Jan 2012)”

  1. Crush sectarianism!

    The fanaticism of sectarian groups killing members of the Shia community has been a bane in Pakistan flourishing in its magnitude with each passing day and will continue to do so owing to the lax response of the law enforcers. On Wednesday, six men belonging to the Shia Muslim community became their targets in Karachi and Quetta, gunned down in a similar way. Three of the deceased in Karachi were lawyers and members of the Legal Aid Committee while the other three murdered in Quetta belonged to the peaceful Shia Hazara community. They included an inspector of the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA), a television artist and a poet. The killings took place only a day after two activists of the Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ) — a re-organised version of the banned militant group Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) — were shot dead in Karachi. There is speculation that the Karachi killings were in response to the murders of ASWJ activists. However, this should not be treated as a ‘tit-for-tat’ response in the face of the mounting death toll of Shias being killed every other day around the country.

    Thousands of Shia Muslims have been killed during the last three decades across the country after General Zia in collaboration with Saudi Arabia endorsed the Deobandi militants and sowed the ugly seeds of sectarianism in society. Since then, the country has been witnessing sectarian violence and bloodshed. Sectarian groups have gained so much strength that it seems almost impossible to control their terrorist activities. Unfortunately, there are several lacunae in the country’s legal system and the prosecution regime is full of flaws, which in turn facilitates the terrorists even if some of them are captured. The same happened in the case of Malik Ishaq, the chief of defunct sectarian group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) who has been released by a court despite the fact that his group had claimed responsibility for the Mastung deadly attack on Iran-bound innocent Hazara pilgrims last year. It is even more unfortunate that Ishaq enjoys a soft corner in the heart of the Punjab government. The presence of these extremist elements can be easily felt in the state institutions, which is another reason for the government’s helplessness against them. The situation indeed reflects the paralysis of political will to take a stern action against these gory murderers.

    The time has come that the government decide the fate of these religious fanatics and use all force to crush them otherwise this contagion will spread and invite retaliation from the victim community. There is also an urgent need to improve the faulty Anti-Terrorism Act and criminal laws or replace them with specially made effective laws so that justice can be served. To fight these saboteurs of peace and religious harmony, the government has to act decisively.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2012%5C01%5C27%5Cstory_27-1-2012_pg3_1

  2. Lawyers’ killingsFrom the Newspaper | Editorial | (7 hours ago) Today
    THOUGH the prospect of violence is never distant in Karachi, over the last year it seems that lawyers are being targeted in calculated hits. In the latest incident, three lawyers were gunned down on Wednesday in the city’s busy Pakistan Chowk area. This appears to have been a sectarian attack as senior lawyer Badar Munir Jafri, along with his son and nephew, were all members of the Shia Lawyers’ Forum. On Tuesday the legal adviser of the Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat was murdered in the city and there are suggestions Wednesday’s attack may have been a revenge killing. Given the dismal performance of our law-enforcement agencies, reports that three policemen in a vehicle nearby did nothing to confront the attackers are hardly surprising. It is this attitude that has contributed to criminals having no fear of the police.

    Around 20 lawyers were killed in Sindh last year — 15 in Karachi — while in this month alone seven lawyers have been gunned down. Many, though not all, of the lawyers killed were defending suspects with links to sectarian and political groups. In the past Karachi has witnessed the targeted killings of doctors, businessmen and professionals belonging to the Shia community. But here we must ask whether lawyers are being eliminated to make the legal fraternity think twice before taking up the brief of suspects accused in sectarian cases. This series of events does not bode well for sectarian harmony in Karachi. If this disturbing trend is not checked now, it may spark much larger communal strife. There is no reason why law-enforcement agencies cannot crack down on the sectarian outfits believed to be behind the violence. Police claims that a ‘third party’ is responsible for the killings do not cut much ice and amount to denying the actual problem — that of armed sectarian militias. Police authorities have reportedly sought to work out a ‘decisive strategy’ to stop the killings. The most decisive moves in this regard would be to dismantle sectarian groups, put suspects on trial and punish those found guilty. But does the state have the political will to take these bold steps?

    http://www.dawn.com/2012/01/27/lawyers-killings.html

  3. Karachi

    The three lawyers — Badr Muneer Jaffery, Shakeel Jaffery and Kafeel Jaffery – gunned down in the Aram Bagh area on Wednesday were laid to rest at Hussaini Sifarat Khana, Malir, after Zohar prayers on Thursday. Hundreds of mourners, led by a local Shia leader, attended the funeral procession.

    After the burial, the mourners raised slogans against the government and demanded the immediate arrest of the culprits. The Shia Ulema Council (SUC) held a press conference outside the graveyard, where its supporters demanded of Chief Justice of Pakistan Iftikhar Mohammad Chaudhry to take suo moto notice against the target killing of Shia lawyers.

    They said that the Shia Ulema Council had called off its ‘dharna’ outside the Governor House on January 1 once they were given assurance by the administration that the leaders of the banned outfit responsible for the killing of Raza Askari would be chastised and that an FIR would also be registered against him. They added that unfortunately, no FIR had been registered against Aurangzeb Farooqui of the Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamat. On the contrary, government emissaries had, since then, been holding talks with Farooqui.

    “The reality is that the government has not placed any checks on the banned outfit, and instead are giving these outfits their patronage,” they alleged. In a joint statement issued by Maulana Ali Anwer Jaffery, Moulana Zafar Taqvi, Moulana Haider Abbas Abdi and Moulana Mehdi, they warned the government to change its behavior toward the Shia community, as “the followers of Hazrat Imam Hussain have never bowed in the face of anti-Islamic forces and have always challenged the Yazid of the time”.

    “We have never bowed our heads before our oppressors; we would rather lay down our lives instead of compromising at the hands of Yazid,” they said. Meanwhile, the call for a strike given by the Shia community had little impact in the city, as commercial areas and trading centres remained open and traffic was also normal. The SUC has announced three days of mourning for the murder of the lawyers.

    http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=89595&Cat=4&dt=1/27/2012

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